Creeping Dalea

Dalea greggii
Characteristics
Category Groundcover
Size 2' x 4'
Flower Color Indigo to Purple
Flower Season Spring to Summer
Exposure Full Sun
Water Low
Growth Rate Moderate
Hardiness 15°F
Notes:

Silvery foliage provides color year-round

Description

Creeping Dalea, also known as “Trailing Indigo Bush,” is an attractive, low-growing perennial with small silvery-gray leaves. Although solitary plants can be grown, Dalea greggii is often used in groupings as a ground cover. There are many fine stems on each plant that cascade from the center and root along the ground as they grow. Over time, these rooted stems create a dense mat that completely covers the surface of the soil. Creeping dalea forms 4-foot wide mounds that reach a maximum height of 2 feet. In low desert regions, its silvery foliage is persistent through the winter providing year-round interest and color. In spring, dense clusters of small indigo to purple colored flowers bloom on creeping dalea and persist into the summer.

Maintenance

Creeping Dalea requires little maintenance. It tolerates heat, cold and drought conditions surviving on as little as 11 inches of annual rainfall. Creeping dalea should be planted in full sun exposures and in soil with good drainage. To use as a ground cover, space plants about 3 feet apart. Water immediately following planting, then water every two to four days for the first month. It can take up to two years to become fully established. Water established plants every two to three weeks in the summer, less in the winter. Old creeping dalea plants often die out in the middle, especially when they have been overwatered or grown in the shade. Prune dalea greggii in the early spring to remove any dead or frost-damaged stems and to reinvigorate the plant.